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 Copyrite  MabulaProSafaris 2017

WHAT PREPARATIONS SHOULD YOU MAKE WHEN GOING ON SAFARI WITH MABULA PRO SAFARIS?

...a lot of research, careful planning and preparations go into making the most of your coming safari - not only because time is always limited, but mostly because you need to focus on enjoying your time with us!

START WITH THE BASICS! THERE’S ALWAYS SOMETHING OVERLOOKED!

...you face a bewildering variety of options and no doubt your friends and family have their ideas about what should happen and what you should take on a first trip to Africa. Good preparation will go a long way towards making your dream safari hassle free! South Africa’s Weather               Useful link: www.weathersa.ca.za South Africa is famous for its sunshine. It's a relatively dry country, with an average annual rainfall of about 464mm. The country is generally a summer-rainfall region, with the western Cape being a winter rainfall area. On the interior plateau, the altitude – Johannesburg lies at 1 694 metres – keeps the average summer temperatures below 30°C. In winter, for the same reason, night- time temperatures can drop to freezing point, and lower in some places. Winter in South Africa – from May to July – is characterised in the higher-lying areas of the interior plateau by dry, sunny, crisp days and cold nights, sometimes with heavy frosts. It's a good idea to bring warm clothes. Autumn in South Africa is from mid-February to April. It offers the best weather in some respects. Very little rain falls over the whole country, and it is warm but not too hot, getting colder as the season progresses. Summer in South Africa lasts from mid-October to mid- February, is characterised by hot, sunny weather – often with afternoon thunderstorms that clear quickly, leaving a warm, earthy, uniquely African smell in the air. Typical interior plateau temperatures, Johannesburg : Winter  68/40F  and  Summer  90/60F Typical coastal temperatures, Cape Town : Winter  65/45F  and  Summer  80/60F
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Medical matters
Things to bring Suitable headwear for sun protection preferably in natural colors. Comfortable shoes for bush wear, serious hunters and hikers should consider ankle boots. Suitable clothing and underwear for summer and winter. For summer, light comfortable clothing preferably in natural colors. For winter warmer clothing is advisable, because our weather can be really unpredictable. Remember to bring binoculars, camera and video equipment to capture the beauty you will witness, in the evening a flash light could be handy as well as a pocketknife. Gloves. Batteries. Sun protection creams Any eyewear you might need plus extra pair . Small magnifying glass (in case you lose / break your glasses). Various size 4 mil Zip Lock bags, rubber bands, safety pins, electrical tie straps and a couple of 39 gal. trash bags (I put my luggage in a trash bag to keep out bull dust and spilled diesel fuel on one trip.) Roll of nylon strapping tape (not silver duct tape) which will fix nearly anything. Lens cleaner fluid and tissues for various optical lenses. Screwdrivers & wrenches necessary for screws on your firearms and scopes. Bug spray with Deet. Leather gloves and full brim hat (not a baseball cap). 3 pairs of everything... long pants, long sleeve shirts, long socks, underwear etc. Laundry is done every day in camp. You can always cut off legs and sleeves. Two of broken-in footwear and extra laces.  Down jacket. bandannas. Rain poncho. Sweaters. Take lot sphotos (of everything ) in case your trophies do not make it back. The photos are some of you best memories in later years and may be all you have. I kept a diary, which I wrote up each night. Animals seen and shot, birds, camp life, names and addresses of people met, etc. The diary and photos of my trip are as important years later as the trophies that now hang on my wall. Make photocopies of your passport; shot record book and prescriptions in case you lose them. Keep separate from the rest of your luggage. Life will be much easier when you show up at our embassy to get new passports etc. You will need a CITES permit to get your cats and elephant home. Take care of that before you go. Tipping: I base tips on 5% to 10% of the daily rate. I leave camp staff a good tip but after consulting with PH. Staff may want tips in local currency. Register with the U.S. State Department Go to: http://www.travel.state.gov and click 'International Travel'. Then hit 'registration with embassies' from the menu on the left side of the tool bar. By providing contacts, your itinerary, passport number and other information, you offer the embassy one simple means of tracking your whereabouts. If you give permission they will also release information to relatives and friends that inquire about you. Simply another precaution to take in these sometimes turbulent travel times.   Medical matters Proper healthcare is never far away but care should be taken to have the necessary vaccinations. Ask your doctor for a strong antibiotic (Cephalexin), and the latest 'stuff' for Malaria. NEVER GIVE YOUR MALARIA MEDICINE AWAY! TAKE IT ALL. Start taking malaria medicine before you leave home. Should you fall ill with flu like symptoms - make sure you are tested for malaria . Malaria medication should be started ahead of time, (please consult your physician or pharmacist). Carry in your hand luggage. Northern Province, Kwa-Zulu Natal and Mpumalanga in South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe are susceptible to malaria. Insect repellants in these areas are advisable. If you use chronic medication, have sufficient medication dispensed to last the trip and carry it in your hand luggage. Some useful medications to check with your phramacist: Benadryl tablets and cream. Zinc Ointment. Aspirin. Drixoral . Aleve or bad necks, back pain etc. Q Vel (for muscle cramps). Surfak (stool softener ). Imodium AD (anti diarrhea). Your preferred heartburn & indigestion meds. Wash & Dry Moist Towelettes . Spenco Blister Gel Kit. Foot powder. Corn cushions . (If you can not walk you can not hunt.) Ace bandage. Q tips. Tweezers. Kleenex tissue packs. Sunscreen. Bactine Hydrocortisone. Mentholatum. Eyewash, Band-Aids (all sizes & shapes), eye patches, Iodine & Iodine swabs , Ambesol (toothache), nasal spray, cough drops (no noise in the leopard blind), Unscented liquid soap for body, hair & clothing if required. When you book your safari - get the latest information from Mabula Pro Safaris - we stay abreast of popular needs!  
Things to bring
  SA Weather
When you book

WHAT PREPARATIONS SHOULD YOU MAKE WHEN GOING

ON SAFARI WITH MABULA PRO SAFARIS?

...a lot of research, careful planning and preparations go into making the most of your coming safari - not only because time is always limited, but mostly because you need to focus on enjoying your time with us!

START WITH THE BASICS! THERE’S ALWAYS SOMETHING

OVERLOOKED!

...you face a bewildering variety of options and no doubt your friends and family have their ideas about what should happen and what you should take on a first trip to Africa. Good preparation will go a long way towards making your dream safari hassle free! South Africa’s Weather               Useful link: www.weathersa.ca.za South Africa is famous for its sunshine. It's a relatively dry country, with an average annual rainfall of about 464mm. The country is generally a summer-rainfall region, with the western Cape being a winter rainfall area. On the interior plateau, the altitude – Johannesburg lies at 1 694 metres – keeps the average summer temperatures below 30°C. In winter, for the same reason, night- time temperatures can drop to freezing point, and lower in some places. Winter in South Africa – from May to July – is characterised in the higher-lying areas of the interior plateau by dry, sunny, crisp days and cold nights, sometimes with heavy frosts. It's a good idea to bring warm clothes. Autumn in South Africa is from mid-February to April. It offers the best weather in some respects. Very little rain falls over the whole country, and it is warm but not too hot, getting colder as the season progresses. Summer in South Africa lasts from mid-October to mid- February, is characterised by hot, sunny weather – often with afternoon thunderstorms that clear quickly, leaving a warm, earthy, uniquely African smell in the air. Typical interior plateau temperatures,  Johannesburg : Winter  68/40F  and  Summer  90/60F Typical coastal temperatures, Cape Town : Winter  65/45F  and  Summer  80/60F
Things to bring Suitable headwear for sun protection preferably in natural colors. Comfortable shoes for bush wear, serious hunters and hikers should consider ankle boots. Suitable clothing and underwear for summer and winter. For summer, light comfortable clothing preferably in natural colors. For winter warmer clothing is advisable, because our weather can be really unpredictable. Remember to bring binoculars, camera and video equipment to capture the beauty you will witness, in the evening a flash light could be handy as well as a pocketknife. Gloves. Batteries. Sun protection creams Any eyewear you might need plus extra pair . Small magnifying glass (in case you lose / break your glasses). Various size 4 mil Zip Lock bags, rubber bands, safety pins, electrical tie straps and a couple of 39 gal. trash bags (I put my luggage in a trash bag to keep out bull dust and spilled diesel fuel on one trip.) Roll of nylon strapping tape (not silver duct tape) which will fix nearly anything. Lens cleaner fluid and tissues for various optical lenses. Screwdrivers & wrenches necessary for screws on your firearms and scopes. Bug spray with Deet. Leather gloves and full brim hat (not a baseball cap). 3 pairs of everything... long pants, long sleeve shirts, long socks, underwear etc. Laundry is done every day in camp. You can always cut off legs and sleeves. Two of broken-in footwear and extra laces.  Down jacket. bandannas. Rain poncho. Sweaters. Take lot sphotos (of everything ) in case your trophies do not make it back. The photos are some of you best memories in later years and may be all you have. I kept a diary, which I wrote up each night. Animals seen and shot, birds, camp life, names and addresses of people met, etc. The diary and photos of my trip are as important years later as the trophies that now hang on my wall. Make photocopies of your passport; shot record book and prescriptions in case you lose them. Keep separate from the rest of your luggage. Life will be much easier when you show up at our embassy to get new passports etc. You will need a CITES permit to get your cats and elephant home. Take care of that before you go. Tipping: I base tips on 5% to 10% of the daily rate. I leave camp staff a good tip but after consulting with PH. Staff may want tips in local currency. Register with the U.S. State Department Go to: http://www.travel.state.gov and click 'International Travel'. Then hit 'registration with embassies' from the menu on the left side of the tool bar. By providing contacts, your itinerary, passport number and other information, you offer the embassy one simple means of tracking your whereabouts. If you give permission they will also release information to relatives and friends that inquire about you. Simply another precaution to take in these sometimes turbulent travel times.   Medical matters Proper healthcare is never far away but care should be taken to have the necessary vaccinations. Ask your doctor for a strong antibiotic (Cephalexin), and the latest 'stuff' for Malaria. NEVER GIVE YOUR MALARIA MEDICINE AWAY! TAKE IT ALL. Start taking malaria medicine before you leave home. Should you fall ill with flu like symptoms - make sure you are tested for malaria . Malaria medication should be started ahead of time, (please consult your physician or pharmacist). Carry in your hand luggage. Northern Province, Kwa-Zulu Natal and Mpumalanga in South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe are susceptible to malaria. Insect repellants in these areas are advisable. If you use chronic medication, have sufficient medication dispensed to last the trip and carry it in your hand luggage. Some useful medications to check with your phramacist: Benadryl tablets and cream. Zinc Ointment. Aspirin. Drixoral . Aleve or bad necks, back pain etc. Q Vel (for muscle cramps). Surfak (stool softener ). Imodium AD (anti diarrhea). Your preferred heartburn & indigestion meds. Wash & Dry Moist Towelettes . Spenco Blister Gel Kit. Foot powder. Corn cushions . (If you can not walk you can not hunt.) Ace bandage. Q tips. Tweezers. Kleenex tissue packs. Sunscreen. Bactine Hydrocortisone. Mentholatum. Eyewash, Band-Aids (all sizes & shapes), eye patches, Iodine & Iodine swabs , Ambesol (toothache), nasal spray, cough drops (no noise in the leopard blind), Unscented liquid soap for body, hair & clothing if required. When you book your safari - get the latest information from Mabula Pro Safaris - we stay abreast of popular needs!  
 Copyrite  MabulaProSafaris 2016
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